Eat the right meat and get more vitamin B12

Eat the right meat and get more vitamin B12


Eat the right meat and get more vitamin B12

  Vitamin B12 is a water-soluble vitamin that keeps your nerves and blood cells healthy. It is responsible for the smooth functioning of several critical body processes. It is pretty easy to develop a vitamin B12 deficiency, the first symptom normally being chronic fatigue.
  Strict vegetarians or vegans, heavy drinkers and smokers are usually most susceptible to vitamin B12 deficiency.
  B12 is found only in animal products, yet even lactoovo vegetarians (those who drink milk and eat eggs) may miss out on it. Sometimes what matters the most isn’t whether a nutrient is found within a food, but whether the body can actually absorb it and use it properly. According to the report in the Journal of Experimental Biology and Medicine, the bioavailability (how much you absorb) of vitamin B12 from eggs is less than 9%, which means that from all the B12 found in eggs, the body absorbs only 9%. Compare this to red meat for example, which has a bioavailability as high as 77%. That’s not to say that eggs are not incredibly nutritious because they are, the yolks in particular, but B12 isn’t their strong suit.
  If you are a vegetarian, vegan, smoker or drinker, you should seriously consider adding B12 to your supplement regimen. Personally, I use vitamin B12 spray every single day for the regulation of my nervous system, which can also reduce stress, worry and anxiety. However, there are numerous other benefits to adding B12 to your supplement regimen if you are not consuming it from food.
  It is required to convert carbohydrates into glucose in the body, thus leading to energy production and a decrease in fatigue and lethargy in the body. Basically, it massively reduces your risk of chronic fatigue.
  It helps maintain a healthy digestive system. Remember, it’s more about what you absorb than what you eat.
  It is essential for healthy skin, hair and nails and can help in cell reproduction and constant renewal of the skin.
  It has been thought to help prevent breast, colon, lung and prostate cancer through regulation of the nervous system.
  Our body can store and recycle B12, an evolutionary adaption that makes sense, as B12 is so necessary that our bodies have evolved the capacity to store it for survival in times of scarcity. However, there’s a downside to being able to store and recycle it: the symptoms of long-term inadequate intake can take years to show themselves. Long-term deficiency puts you at a risk of nerve degeneration, mental disturbance and depression amongst a host of other problems.
  Once these symptoms manifest, it’s nearly impossible to fully recover. The take-home message is to make sure that you get enough vitamin B12 from your meat or consider adding it to your supplement regimen. Personally, I only eat red meat once or twice a week, so I hedge my bets and supplement with it.